Reformation Lutheran Church A Congregation of the ELCA

Thursday, March 10 Read Revelation 3:15-22

Listen, I am standing at the door knocking; if you hear my voice and open the door, I will come in to you and eat with you, and you with me. Revelation 3:20

Listen!

I was somewhat perplexed about how to address a verse from Revelation and be true to the book itself. Revelation is an apocalyptic writing, an unveiling or, simply, a revelation. The author, John, a disciple of Christ and thought to be the leader of several Christian communities, had been banished to the isle of Patmos in the Aegean Sea. The Christian church was under great persecution, and John used symbolic writing to convey hope to the followers of Christ. The main purpose of the book of Revelation was to convey instruction, warning and encouragement to Christian churches of the day.

Our Christian faith today seems to be assaulted from many directions. We live in a world that seems to be driven by greed. We are bombarded with messages to consume, to look out for No. 1. We are hurried and rushed in a world that seems to become more and more dangerous and violent. Where to turn? Turn to God, the sanity in a world that seems to have gone mad.

Step back and listen. John wrote to each of the seven churches regarding his revelations from Christ. John admonishes the church in Laodicea, a wealthy commercial city that he describes as lukewarm, to become more zealous. “Listen, I am standing at the door knocking; if you hear my voice and open the door, I will come to you…”

One of the hymns we sing today perfectly mirrors this revelation, “Listen, God Is Calling.” The refrain reads, “Listen, listen, God is calling, through the Word inviting, offering forgiveness, comfort and joy.”

Today we find our solace in God. He is our hope in a world gone mad. He sent his son to save us and he is there to protect us. His mandate to each of us is to share his good news and to reach out and share his love.

Sometimes in our hurry we rush by people, even in church. We fail to take time to speak or smile or acknowledge their existence. I challenge each one of you to take time to greet one another, not just your friends or acquaintances, but everyone. Christ admonishes us in Matthew 25:40: “Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me.”

Judy McDiffett

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